Roman DNA

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Re: Roman DNA

Postby E.P. Grondine » Tue May 15, 2018 6:33 am


Hi Simon -

simon wrote:Regrettably Adomnan's acct of St Columbass is not in the order of importance as Patrick's Confessio and Letter to Coroticus. They are earlier and are of pivotal importance.

Patrick is the only Roman Briton to tell us of his life. He was not Irish. Hence his importance.
Patrick's father was a decurion. Who appointed him? How did he collect the taxes?
Patrick wandered in the wilderness for 28 days after escaping from Ireland not seeing another human.
Where can this have been? Gaul?
Does it reflect the devastation of the post Roman period?
He refers to the Franks being pagans.


All good questions for the free floating Patrick materials.
Now with Columba, we have an interlocking set of materials,
all concerning interactions with major leaders.
Those leaders include the church leaders of the early christian establishments in Ireland.

If we work through the later Columba materials,
then we have a much better frame work for analyzing the earlier Patrick materials.

While Patrick gets multiple study centers,
Columba gets...

simon wrote:Read what Patrick says, and what Pelagian materials?
Patrick and Gildas and Adomnan are not Pelagians.
This is very important.


What materials?
Whatever Roman Catholic Church materials are available.
Whatever their personal beliefs and religious practices,
we may be certain the all of them interacted with Pelagians,
and those materials will likely throw light on the much earlier Druids,
if we can but understand them.

simon wrote:Not sure what is meant by "problem" with Anglo saxon gold artifacts. There is no problem.
Analysis has been done. It is thought gold coins are the main source.


I prefer "It is" to "It is thought".

That new Spanish Lab is the bee's knees -
laser samples, well below human perception, with definitive isotopic analysis .

Aside from the gold sources, which may have also included earlier Irish gold,
you have the questions of the compositions and sources of the inlays and enamels
of that extra-ordinarily beautiful bling.

The problem with the "Anglo Saxon" gold is the recurring Pict motifs, along with the Coptic Interlace.
Along with no earlier artifacts in the raiders tribal lands either on the Continent or in the northern peninsulas.

Where was/were the workshop(s)?
That is the question.
And my working hypothesis is that it/they was/were
located in the Ayr/Girvan area.

simon wrote:Britain is a very small place. There are no lost goldmines here. There is no Lassiter's lost reef or secret Maori gold strikes.

If you are interested in that sort of thing I have been told there is a gold reef in Fiordland which gets covered at high tide. The person who told me came from the South Island and his grandfather had rescued the explorer who found it, sadly he died before revealing much more.


You're looking at gold, have you ever considered meteorites?
Say Native American meteorites?
I have (after all I did write a book named "Man and Impact in the Americas")
and much of what I know I do not share, due to the greed of a few people -
whose love has become lust.

simon wrote:It is thought that some of these objects are not plunder but tribute or payment.
They were not made in Scotland, they are hack silver brought from some where else.
They could be the pay of returning mercenaries, payment to keep the frontier quiet.
This was standard throughout the Empire.


I was referring to hoards of the sea raiders found at their homes on continental Europe, not the Scottish hoards.

For some reason the other Pict capital, the one around Glasgow, that of the Cruit,
is ignored in all of this, and the analysis of the Gododin/Ventureiones capital at Edinburgh is extended there.
Which assumption is not in any agreement with any of our text sources,
and likely to be demonstrably wrong.

simon wrote:Sorry but to suggest Scotland has no scholars since WW1 is insulting and prejudicial.
Scotland has some fine archaeologists at least as good as Ohio.


While Ohio has many fine archaeologists,
a few of those working with the Ohio Historical Society are world class atrocious,
and any general comparison of those working in Scotland with them
is thus both very insulting and very prejudicial.

I'm sure Scotland has many very good archaeologists -
it simply the south West of Scotland, which I was referring to.
My impression is that those working there died in the trenched of World War I.

simon wrote:Who these locals are one cannot comment but if they are interfering with Pictish monuments they are breaking the law.


Christ!
The major Shawnee/Cherokee ancestral complex located at Lancaster now lies under the new Walmart there!

I was nor speaking about deliberate vandalsim,
simply destruction by natural forces,
and the lack of that database of recordings,
and the lack of recovery and conservation of the Pict Stelae.

simon wrote:Why on earth would you think only Christians traded with Gaul. Have you not heard of Sutton Hoo?


I saw a Sutton Hoo exhibit in San Francisco when I was 10 years old. Most impressive!
But there is nothing equivalent to that Gaul E pottery that I am aware of.

Last edited by E.P. Grondine on Tue May 15, 2018 8:27 am, edited 17 times in total.
E.P. Grondine
 

Re: Roman DNA

Postby Simon21 » Tue May 15, 2018 7:39 am

Nothing from Columba is contemporary.

The garnets come from around the baltic. This has been answered. The silver bowls from Sutton Hoo come rom Syria. They may be St Augustine's originals. They have been analysed scientifically there is no reasonable doubt.

The hoardes issue still applies. They not be plunder and I haven't heard of any such finds definitively stated to come from Britain. It would be near impossible to prove.

Not sure what is meant by workshops? Precious metals were worked under the eye of the emperor at the imperial court. Same applies to local rulers.
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Re: Roman DNA

Postby E.P. Grondine » Tue May 15, 2018 8:36 am


Simon21 wrote:Nothing from Columba is contemporary.


Yes.
So Deconstructing Adomnan's LIfe tof Columba to its sources is one very useful task yet to be done.
My demonstration back in 2003 of the destruction of Bazas in Gaul opened a path for this.

Simon21 wrote:The garnets come from around the Baltic. This has been answered.


I was and am completely unaware of any garnet sources in the Baltic area.
And until we have atomic analysis of the garnets composition,
we're working with a whole lot of assumptions.

If the garnets came from the Baltics, which particular deposit(s),
and where was the trading center that controlled them?

Simon21 wrote:The silver bowls from Sutton Hoo come from Syria.
They may be St Augustine's originals.
They have been analysed scientifically there is no reasonable doubt.


Let's see:
The silver bowls came from Syria to local church centers,
and had then been taken as plunder from them?

Simon21 wrote:The hoardes issue still applies.
They not be plunder and I haven't heard of any such finds definitively stated to come from Britain.
It would be near impossible to prove.


The problem is the Pict motifs and the Coptic Interlace found on items in those hoards of plunder.
The problem is not Brittania, but Scotia and the Picti.

Simon21 wrote:Not sure what is meant by workshops?
Precious metals were worked under the eye of the emperor at the imperial court.
The same applies to local rulers.


No one has located either of the PIct royal metal workshops,
neither the one around Edinburgh,
nor the one around Glasgow.
E.P. Grondine
 

Re: Roman DNA

Postby E.P. Grondine » Wed May 16, 2018 6:28 am


Hi Simon -

To give yo an idea of the importance of the Life of Columba, this passage appears to be a reference to Vortigern, with a location given, and a rough and very confused description of Mithraic rites. It wold be nice to have the Andersons' text and translation at hand,

CHAPTER XVI. CONCERNING A VESSEL
WHICH A SORCERER NAMED SILNAN HAD FILLED WITH MILK TAKEN FROM A BULL.

THE following is told as having occurred in the house of a rich peasant named Foirtgirn, who lived in Mount Cainle (not identified). When the saint was staying there, he decided justly a dispute between two rustics, whose coming to him he knew beforehand: and one of them, who was a sorcerer, took milk, by his diabolical art, at the command of the saint, from a bull that was near. This the saint directed to be done, not to confirm these sorceries--God forbid! but to put an end to them in the presence of all the people. The blessed man, therefore, demanded that the vessel, full, as it seemed to be, of this milk, should be immediately given to him; and he blessed it with this sentence, saying: "Now it shall in this way be proved that this is not true milk, as it is supposed to be, but blood, which is coloured by the artifice of demons to impose on men." This was no sooner said than the milky colour gave place to the true natural colour of blood. The bull also, which in the space of one hour wasted and pined away with a hideous leanness, and was all but dead, was sprinkled with water that had been blessed by the saint, and recovered with astonishing rapidity.
Last edited by E.P. Grondine on Wed May 16, 2018 2:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Roman DNA

Postby Simon21 » Wed May 16, 2018 7:48 am

Yes.
So Deconstructing Adomnan's LIfe tof Columba to its sources is one very useful task yet to be done.
My demonstration back in 2003 of the destruction of Bazas in Gaul opened a path for this.


I am sorry this is entirely irrelvant. Patrick is a contemporary. As is Gildas. Have you even read these sources? And I do not underestand the last bit. Bazas still exists.

Saint's lives are in general not to be credited.

I was and am completely unaware of any garnet sources in the Baltic area.
And until we have atomic analysis of the garnets composition,
we're working with a whole lot of assumptions.


There is n o question where the garnets come from. And frankly coming from someone who quotes a saints life as a source this is rather rich.
Sorry the origins of the gold and precious material has been established. End of. What atoms are supposed to prove is neither her nor there. Presumably you mean crystallography etc. To repeat, this has been done. Many so called Viking items in Sweden etc have been traced to their areas of origin.

If the garnets came from the Baltics, which particular deposit(s),
and where was the trading center that controlled them?


You are not aware of the enormous research on the North Sea trading zones?

Let's see:
The silver bowls came from Syria to local church centers,
and had then been taken as plunder from them?


Sorry I cannot understand the English here. What do you mean, what local church centres? Sutton Hoo was not a church. Presumably they camer from the Vatican since that is where Augustine came from. This is referred to in Bede.
No one has located either of the PIct royal metal workshops,
neither the one around Edinburgh,
nor the one around Glasgow.


And no one has located Julius Caesar's head, do you doubt he had one? I think you do not quite understand how ancient products were manufactured. There were not big modern factories,
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Re: Roman DNA

Postby Simon21 » Wed May 16, 2018 7:55 am

CHAPTER XVI. CONCERNING A VESSEL
WHICH A SORCERER NAMED SILNAN HAD FILLED WITH MILK TAKEN FROM A BULL.

THE following is told as having occurred in the house of a rich peasant named Foirtgirn, who lived in Mount Cainle (not identified). When the saint was staying there, he decided justly a dispute between two rustics, whose coming to him he knew beforehand: and one of them, who was a sorcerer, took milk, by his diabolical art, at the command of the saint, from a bull that was near. This the saint directed to be done, not to confirm these sorceries--God forbid! but to put an end to them in the presence of all the people. The blessed man, therefore, demanded that the vessel, full, as it seemed to be, of this milk, should be immediately given to him; and he blessed it with this sentence, saying: "Now it shall in this way be proved that this is not true milk, as it is supposed to be, but blood, which is coloured by the artifice of demons to impose on men." This was no sooner said than the milky colour gave place to the true natural colour of blood. The bull also, which in the space of one hour wasted and pined away with a hideous leanness, and was all but dead, was sprinkled with water that had been blessed by the saint, and recovered with astonishing rapidity.


Am I to assume you beleive this? I am sorry but one cannot discuss these issues with someone who haas not read the sources. The above is simply a demonstratin of why Saint's lives are generally not credible.

There are hundreds of them.
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Re: Roman DNA

Postby E.P. Grondine » Wed May 16, 2018 1:15 pm


Hi Simon -

Yes I have read the souces, but years ago, before my stroke.

I do not "believe" The life of Columba. What I am interested in are the original sources used to construct it.

Let me give you an example from
https://cosmictusk.com/reprint-grondine ... an-empire/
(I'll never do that quality of work again.)

Gregory of Tour’s (539-594 CE) note for events ca. 580 CE,
the fifth year of the reign of King Childebert II
(Gregory of Tours, History of the Franks, V.33, Lewis Thorpe translation, Penguin Books, 1974, pages 295-296):

“Villages around Bordeaux were burned by a fire sent from heaven:
it took so swift a hold that homesteads and threshing floors with the grain still spread out on them
were reduced to ashes.
There was no other apparent cause of this fire, so it must have come from God.

“The city of Orleans blazed with a great conflagration.
Even the richer citizens lost their all,
and if anyone managed to salvage anything from the flames
it was immediately snatched away by the thieves who crowded around.”

It has been known for some time that Gregory worked from two sets of annals,
as was seen earlier in his two separate passages given above on the Breton revolt for 579 CE.
While Gregory placed the following annal entry for 582 CE,
the analysis immediately following demonstrates
that it does not agree with Gregory’s other annal entry for 582 CE
(which was set out immediately above), but instead matches the events of the annal entry for 580 CE.
(Gregory of Tours, History of the Franks, VI.21, O.M. Dalton translation, Oxford, 1927, page 253):

“In this year again appeared the following portents. The Moon was eclipsed.

"In the territory of Tours real blood flowed from broken bread.
The walls of Soissons fell down. The earth quaked at Angers.
Wolves entered the walls of Bordeaux, and without any fear of men, devoured dogs.
A fiery light was seen to traverse the sky.

"The city of Bazas was burned, so that the churches and the houses belonging to them were destroyed.
We learned, however, that all the sacred vessels were saved from the flames.

COMPARISON OF GREGORY’S SECOND 582 CE ANNAL ENTRY
WITH HIS FIRST 582 CE ANNAL ENTRY, AND WITH THAT OF 580 CE

There are no similarities between Gregory’s second and first annal entries for 582 CE,
between those of H.F. VI.14 and H.F. VI.21.
There are marked similarities between Gregory’s second annal entry for 582 CE (VI.21)
with the first annal entry which he earlier gave for 580 CE (V.33):

Annal entry for 580 CE, H.F. V.33, Lewis Thorpe translation, Penguin Books, 1974, pages 295-296, via Phil Burns:

“In the fifth year of King Childebert’s reign great floods devastated parts of the Auvergne.
The rain continued for twelve days
and the Limage was under such a depth of water that all sowing had to cease.
The River Loire, the River Allier (which used to be called the Flavaris)
and the mountain-streams which run into this latter
were so swollen that they rose higher above the flood-level than ever before.
Many cattle were drowned, the crops ruined, and buildings inundated.
The River Rhone, at the spot where it meets the Saone, overflowed its banks
and brought heavy loss to the inhabitants, undermining parts of the city of Lyons.

“When the rains stopped, the trees came out in leaf once more,
although by now it was September.”

“In Touraine this same year, one morning before the day had dawned,
a bright light was seen to traverse the sky and then disappear in the East.
A sound as of trees crashing to the ground was heard throughout the whole region,
but it can hardly have been a tree for it was audible over fifty miles and more.”

Annal entry purportedly for 582 CE from H.F. VI.21:
“A fiery light was seen to traverse the sky.”

Returning to the annal entry for 580 CE, H.F. V.33:
“In this same year again the city of Bordeaux was sadly shaken by an earthquake.
The city walls were in great danger of collapsing.
The entire populace was filled with the fear of death,
for they imagined that they would be swallowed up with their city
unless they fled. Many of them escaped to neighboring townships.
This terrible disaster followed them to the places where they had sought refuge
and extended even into Spain, but there it was less serious.
Huge rocks came cascading down from the mountain peaks of the Pyrenees,
crushing in their wake the local inhabitants and their cattle.

Annal entry purportedly for 582 CE from H.F. VI.21:
“The walls of Soissons fell down. The earth quaked at Angers.
Wolves entered the walls of Bordeaux, and without any fear of men, devoured dogs.”

Returning to the 580 CE annal entry from H.F. V.33:
“Villages around Bordeaux were burned by a fire sent from heaven:
it took so swift a hold that homesteads and threshing floors with the grain still spread out on them
were reduced to ashes.
There was no other apparent cause of this fire,
so it must have come from God.

Compare the annal entry purportedly for 582 CE from H.F. VI.21:
“The city of Bazas was burned,
so that the churches and the houses belonging to them were destroyed.
We learned, however, that all the sacred vessels were saved from the flames.”

Returning to the 580 CE entry from V.33:
“The city of Orleans blazed with a great conflagration.
Even the richer citizens lost their all,
and if anyone managed to salvage anything from the flames
it was immediately snatched away by the thieves who crowded around.

“Somewhere near Chartres blood poured forth when a loaf of bread was broken in two.

Compare the annal entry purportedly for 582 CE from H.F. VI.21:
“In the territory of Tours real blood flowed from broken bread.”

Returning to the 580 CE entry:
“At the same time the city of Bourges was scourged by a hailstorm.”

THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL EVIDENCE
FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF BAZAS IN LA GIRONDE IN 580 CE

A brief survey of the archaeological evidence for signs of impact destruction was conducted
by examining the Carte Archeologique de la Gaule, Volume 33/1, La Gironde,
Fondation Maison des Sciences De l’Homme, Paris,1994.
As this pre-inventory focuses on finds, rather than on destruction levels,
it is possible to say no more than that both Bazas and the entire area around the city
were re-built immediately following 580 CE.

INITIAL ANALYSIS OF GREGORY OF TOUR’S REPORT

The most important thing to note is that Orleans (Civitas Aurelianorum) is not in the Bordeaux region –
these are separate events.
Perhaps the fire at Orleans may be related to a small fragment impact,
or the fall of very small fragments of the same impactor,
but on the other hand Orleans at that time was along the focus of a power struggle in Gaul,
so either arson or accident seem far more likely.
In any case, Orleans lies a small distance from Gregory’s home city of Tours,
and if an impactor or small fragments had hit there, Gregory surely would have told us much more about it.

Now compare the LIfe of Columba. The passage given here follows Alan and Marjorie Andersons’
severely flawed translation as well as their excellent Latin text: Adomnan’s
Life of Saint Columba, Alan Orr Anderson and Marjorie Olgivie Anderson,
Thomas Nelson & Sons, London & Edinburgh, 1961, pages 262-263:

“THE PROPHECY OF THE HOLY MAN REGARDING THE ROMAN CITY,
BURNT BY A SULFUROUS FIRE WHICH FELL FROM HEAVEN

“Similarly at another time, on a day after the threshing of the grain,
Lugbe, of the family of mocu-Min, whom we have mentioned above, going to the
saint was unable to look upon his face, which was flushed with a marvellous
redness; and becoming greatly afraid he quickly fled away.
But the saint called him back by slight clapping of his hands. Returning,
he was at once asked why he had run away so quickly, and he made this
reply: “I fled because I was much afraid.”

“And proceeding with greater confidence, after a slight pause, he took
courage to question the saint, saying: “No fearful vision has been shown to
you, has it, in this very hour?” The saint gave him this answer: “Very
terrible retribution has just now been made, in a distant part of the
world.” “What kind of retribution?”, said the youth, “And in what country
has it been made?”

“Then the saint spoke thus: “In this hour, sulphurous flame has been poured
down from heaven upon a city of the Roman dominion within the borders of
Italy; and close upon three thousand men, not counting the number of women
and children, have perished. And before the present year is ended, the
Gallic sailors arriving from the provinces of Gaul will tell you the same.”

“After some months these words were proved to have been correct. For this
Lugbe went, along with the holy man to the chief place of the district; and
he (Lugbe) questioned the master and sailors of a ship which arrived, and
heard those things about the city and its inhabitants related by them, all
precisely as the memorable man had said.”

As further confirmation that an impact occurred in Bordeaux,
note that the news of the impact was confirmed to Lugbe mocu-Min
by sailors who had arrived from Gaul.
Finally, both stories share the same precise detail that the impact occurred at threshing time: August 10 or so, anyone?

While the date of the Bordeaux impact, 580 CE, agrees well with Columba’s
stay on Iona 563-597 CE, the report does not involve a city in Italy.
Of course, it could be that this particular bit of information is
an addition made by either Cumene or Adomnan during their conversion of the Iona annals entry to the present tense:
“Sulfurea de caelo flamima super romani juris civitatem in(tra) Italia terminos sitam (hac hora) efusa(s est)”, or
“Sulfurea de caelo flamima super romani juris civitatem, inF(x)ra Italia terminos sitam, (hac hora) efusa(s est)”.
As will be shown here a little later, this is almost certainly the case.


Last edited by E.P. Grondine on Wed May 16, 2018 2:35 pm, edited 8 times in total.
E.P. Grondine
 

Re: Roman DNA

Postby E.P. Grondine » Wed May 16, 2018 1:35 pm


Moving on to the other issues you raise, Simon

simon wrote:There is no question where the garnets come from.
And frankly coming from someone who quotes a saints life as a source this is rather rich.

Sorry, the origins of the gold and precious material has been established. End of.
What atoms are supposed to prove is neither her nor there.
Presumably you mean crystallography etc. To repeat, this has been done.
Many so called Viking items in Sweden etc have been traced to their areas of origin.


I have no knowledge of any work done on Baltic garnet sources,
nor of any trading center controlling that supply.
Would you care to share introductory materials?
simon wrote:You are not aware of the enormous research on the North Sea trading zones?


Yes, I m not aware of any of it,
and further can not find it with a simple google search.
Any names of key researchers or sites you could share?

While I have no problem with silver being attributed to the Romans,
even then the Romans had a lot of silver sources.
As far as the gold sources go, that is another question.

Before the development of laser sampling by this Spanish lab,
you had to expose metal artifacts to difficultly high levels of radiation.
Laser sampling and isotopic analysis is a very powerful new tool.
It will have global application.

Let's see:
The Sutton Hoo silver bowls came from Syria to local church centers,
and had then been taken as plunder from them?

simon wrote:Sorry I cannot understand the English here. What do you mean, what local church centres?
Sutton Hoo was not a church.
Presumably they camer from the Vatican since that is where Augustine came from. This is referred to in Bede.


What I am suggesting is the possibility that the Sutton Hoo bowls were not gifts from the Vatican,
but instead plunder from early church centers, plunder which had been handed down by the original raiding princes.
E.P. Grondine
 

Re: Roman DNA

Postby Simon21 » Thu May 17, 2018 4:13 am

[quote]
Re: Roman DNA
Unread postby E.P. Grondine » Wed May 16, 2018 8:15 pm


Sorry I have read Gregory of Tours and studied his work. None of this is remotrely relevant. What is the point here? Just to show you have read Gregaory of Tours?

Sorry you seem obsessed with meteorites. Is this meant seriously?

The only relevant thing here is that Gregory states that Æthelberh was " a man of Kent". What do yuou think this means

May I suggest that instead of posting huge irrlevant quotes and trying to suggest Roman Gaul was destroyed by meteors you read these sources.

I comment on your entries but you ignore mine - I await your views on decurions in sub roman Britain
Simon21
 
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Re: Roman DNA

Postby Simon21 » Thu May 17, 2018 4:20 am

E.P. Grondine wrote:[size=135]
Moving on to the other issues you raise, Simon

simon wrote:There is no question where the garnets come from.
And frankly coming from someone who quotes a saints life as a source this is rather rich.

Sorry, the origins of the gold and precious material has been established. End of.
What atoms are supposed to prove is neither her nor there.
Presumably you mean crystallography etc. To repeat, this has been done.
Many so called Viking items in Sweden etc have been traced to their areas of origin.


I have no knowledge of any work done on Baltic garnet sources,
nor of any trading center controlling that supply.
Would you care to share introductory materials?
simon wrote:You are not aware of the enormous research on the North Sea trading zones?

Yes, I m not aware of any of it,
and further can not find it with a simple google search.
Any names of key researchers or sites you could share?


Then I suggest a course in reading, It is quite established info now. The Staffordshire hoard was identified in a year.

While I have no problem with silver being attributed to the Romans,
even then the Romans had a lot of silver sources.
As far as the gold sources go, that is another question
.

I simply do not understand this strange remark. You beleive they got their gold from outer space? Even though it has been proved scientifically where it comes from.

Before the development of laser sampling by this Spanish lab,
you had to expose metal artifacts to difficultly high levels of radiation.
Laser sampling and isotopic analysis is a very powerful new tool.
It will have global application.


Again I do not understand this. Spanish labs? Why bother trying to locate something that has been located?

You seem not to be able to accept facts. Why should a Spanish lab be better than one in Ohio or Manchester?

What I am suggesting is the possibility that the Sutton Hoo bowls were not gifts from the Vatican,
but instead plunder from early church centers, plunder which had been handed down by the original raiding princes.



Sorry still don't understand this. Are all your precious goods the result of theft?
]
Simon21
 
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Re: Roman DNA

Postby E.P. Grondine » Thu May 17, 2018 5:00 am


simon wrote:Sorry you seem obsessed with meteorites. Is this meant seriously?


It's not meteorites, Simon. The meteorites are incidental.
Since roughly 1997, I have been retrieving accounts of geologically "recent" asteroid and comet impacts
using historical and proto historical records to guide that search.
Yes, I am serious.
it is a very serious matter, a matter of life and death.

E.P. Grondine
 

Re: Roman DNA

Postby E.P. Grondine » Thu May 17, 2018 2:33 pm


simon wrote:Sorry I have read Gregory of Tours and studied his work. None of this is remotrely relevant.
What is the point here? Just to show you have read Gregaory of Tours?


Hello, simon.

There are multiple points here, not just one.

In 1997, I became aware of the work of Clube and Napier and others on recent asteoid and comet impacts.
First off, a lot of that work was pretty bad, and
second, these impact events were a powerful new tool for anthropological work, and
third, they explained a number of the standing questions.

I try to be as rigorous as possible with my work,
given its significance.
Both millions of lives and millions of dollars of spending in space are at issue.
These sums far exceed the budgets of normal archaeological spending,
and this issue is of vastly more import than most of the issues studied.
I have to get this nuts on right, as lives hang in the balance.

So while Pib Burns had earlier pointed out
Gregory's statement about the destruction of Bazas,
I had to verify and check it all out as rigorously as possible.

I had earlier worked through the Life of Columba looking for remainders of the Pict language.
To my earlier list of the O/U medial vowel preceeding a tribal name to indicate kingship,
and the tribal name compounds with aka to indicate tribal lands,
I need to add the mac/mocu family term, which has parallels in Etruscan.
These morphemes are all PIE.
That is the first point.

Second point, at the time (2003) there was a volcanic eruption of unknown date,
and debate over the dates and causes of dust loadings and related climate downturns.
I did what I could to sort that out using what was at hand.

Third point.
What I demonstrated was that the Life of Columba had been generated from contemporary documents.
I am not speaking about the hundreds of Saints lives, just this one.

I consider further work at Bazas the responsibility of the French archaeological authorities and the CNRS.
As far as Southwest Scotland goes, once I have put my "geological specimens" in the mail,
and returned them to the local residents there, my responsibilities will be discharged.

I only have a few more days vacation here.
I am greatly enjoying watching the videos about the CAM-CAD print on demand work being done in Birmingham
on the Staffordshire hoard, and think that it will be a real boost for them.

I do not know where in the UK their national laser sampling and analysis facility will be built.

simon wrote:May I suggest that instead of posting huge irrelevant quotes and trying to suggest Roman Gaul was destroyed by meteors you read these sources.


Simon, I did not state that all of Roman Gaul was destroyed by impact,
just Bazas, which sat on a key trade route between the Islands and Rome.
There was far more maritime traffic than simply that crossing the Channel,
as we can now clearly see from the E pottery distribution.

The sources you mention were exhausted sometime in the 1970's.
Work moved on long ago to regional documents
but that still leaves sources like the Life of Columba yet available for desk analysis.

The destruction of Bazas will likely show up in Bishops lists,
and/or the Vatican Library.

Yes, my working hypothesis is that most of the better "Anglo-Saxon" bling is loot from raids,
and until demonstrated otherwise,
say through the recovery of jewelry workshops,
I intend to stick with it.

Now where are those papers on the garnet sources?


Last edited by E.P. Grondine on Thu May 17, 2018 3:07 pm, edited 5 times in total.
E.P. Grondine
 

Re: Roman DNA

Postby E.P. Grondine » Thu May 17, 2018 2:50 pm


simon wrote:I comment on your entries but you ignore mine - I await your views on decurions in sub roman Britain


There is a Clodus mentioned in the Life of Columba.
Was there a Claudius gens in Brittania?
E.P. Grondine
 

Re: Roman DNA

Postby Simon21 » Thu May 17, 2018 4:26 pm

E.P. Grondine wrote:
simon wrote:I comment on your entries but you ignore mine - I await your views on decurions in sub roman Britain


There is a Clodus mentioned in the Life of Columba.
Was there a Claudius gens in Brittania?


Sorry this is incoherent. Do you know what a decurion is? What is your view? Is it not this reference intriguing?
Simon21
 
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Joined: Fri Jan 03, 2014 4:40 am

Re: Roman DNA

Postby Simon21 » Thu May 17, 2018 4:33 pm

[quote="E.P. Grondine"][size=135]
[quote="simon"]
Sorry you seem obsessed with meteorites. Is this meant seriously?
[/quote

We all have to die, it's a good thing.

I am talking about aculturisation. The reason you and I speak and read English and largely think the way we do.
Simon21
 
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