This is Us

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This is Us

Postby uniface » Mon Mar 28, 2016 5:37 am

Bombing – and more specifically terrorism – is back in the headlines. This time it is Brussels. It hardly ever goes away. It’s like someone put it there.

But it wasn’t always like this. The threat used to be called the Soviet Union. But that went away. And then a new threat came along, just in time to fill the void. The bogeyman business didn’t miss a beat.

Terrorism as a brand got underway with 9/11. But there were some pre-campaign teasers: the first Twin Tower attack, and the Murrah building, for example. Since 9/11 things stepped up with highlights including 7/7, Madrid, Paris and now Brussels.

As a result, the world is being made more draconian. A clampdown is evident everywhere, and we – the taxpaying sheep who are being fleeced to fit the bill – are being transported by degrees from the green field where things were generally pretty and hopeful and we felt we had rights to a new, nasty field coated with asphalt, and hedged about with razor-blade wire, sentries and CCTV.

And the justification for this is always the same: terrorism. So who benefits?

Who benefits is anyone in favor of big government, standardization of factors of production, and worldwide conformity; in short: anyone invested in a one-world tyranny. And the people with the motive just so happen to be the same as those with the means to ensure that events lead to such an outcome: the very rich and powerful.

I’m not going to try to convince you of my reasoning. The internet exists. If you have an index finger and eyeballs and still haven’t done due diligence on such topics, there’s no hope for you. Just go back to Netflix and order a pizza.

The widening gulf

What I want to look at more specifically is the gulf between those who discern an undisclosed pattern behind the roll-out of world events, and those who come from a position predicated on haphazard coincidence and official explanations.

People split into two main factions under stress. The first – the majority – conforms to the requests of authority. It feels that the prevalent view must be the correct one, and it looks to the strong figure of state or mullah or dictator to tell it what is to be done. A smaller group is guided by an inner compass; it has misgivings about the prevalent view. And a much smaller subset of this smaller group acts on what it knows or feels.

What is happening is that, as stresses on the human psyche increase as we are transitioned from one reality to another, society is being split along a single fracture line. One the one hand are those who tend, under stress, to go with the official orthodoxy: vaccines, inclusionism, feminism, rigid historical narratives, terrorist bogeymen, etc. On the other are those who tend, under stress, to smell a rat and look for answers in places other than mainstream media and sanctioned education.

And as the pressure on the psychological system builds up with increasing stresses, these two groups – the orthodox and the unorthodox – are becoming polarized, and to such an extent it is hard for them to understand each other.

The first group, then, we are calling orthodox. These are those people who – more often than not – need more to have a sense of being normal and belonging to a larger group. It all works well for them as long as there is no major tectonic shift (the sudden collapse of the Soviet Union, for example, handed such people their heads on a plate). They come from all walks of life but are particularly visible in the so-called professions – positions which are vulnerable to criticism and thus require a high level of conformity.

Such people like to attack those who diverge from the tracks along which their narrative runs by means of name-calling (the use of ‘Nazi’ is a particular favorite). The irony is, obviously, that had they themselves lived at the time of the Third Reich, it is they who would have been card-carrying National Socialists – given that such was the orthodoxy of the day – whereas the objects of their attacks are less likely to have been so; they are unorthodox now, they would probably have been unorthodox then.

The unorthodox know something is wrong, and they don’t follow the party line. Obviously, this is a broad church and includes more variety of opinion than one can shake a stick at. But just as I have simple rule of thumb for establishing whether a country is third-world or not (it’s any place where you have to offer taxi drivers a tip to drive more slowly), so I have a simple rule of thumb for establishing whether what you think belongs to the unorthodox category: if you have to check yourself before speaking for fear that someone might be ‘offended’.

Here, I don’t mean offended in the old fashioned sense (I say something actually offensive and you respond); I mean it in the new sense: I say anything at all which hasn’t been vetted by the gatekeepers of acceptable thought (i.e. the limited and bland range of opinions one finds today in mainstream media).

With the emergence of the internet, a gulf has opened up between the orthodox and the unorthodox camps, with increasingly strained relations between the two. The former have the media, the government, the education system and most of the undecided on their side; so they have the numbers – at least until there is a major collapse, as happened in the Soviet Union, after which they became merely ineffectual and cut rather sad figures as they got old.

But while the system holds up, they look in disdain at those who question the very foundations upon which their edifice is built.

The orthodox see themselves as educated and informed. The unorthodox see the orthodox as brainwashed morons and regard themselves as (newly) awake.

The orthodox, for their part, dismiss the unorthodox as conspiracy theorists (by which term they mean: people whose opinions are based in something other than objective reality – if it were objectively real, the sources which provide the orthodox with their opinions would have told them about it).

Within families or with friends, the results can be particular painful. Typically one person begins to question the official line and goes about trying to ‘wake up’ other members of the family. This results in alienation on both sides.

As things on the world stage get worse – and it’s safe to assume they will – these two groups will increasingly be at loggerheads; at least up to the point where unorthodox opinion is re-branded terrorism.

At this point, I foresee open persecution of the unorthodox and a fracture into two informational species – the Eloi and the Morlocks of perception if you like – with one side clinging to the main media and standard education for answers and the other increasingly alienated and irreconcilable with their orthodox counterparts.

Those whose intellects and instincts prevent them from aligning themselves with orthodoxy will need to be prepared to fight when the battle of perception spills out of the internet and into real life.

And that being the case, it’s best to start making the hard choices now.

Sam Gerrans https://www.rt.com/op-edge/337361-land- ... telescope/
uniface
 

Re: This is Us

Postby Minimalist » Mon Mar 28, 2016 10:25 am

I’m not going to try to convince you of my reasoning. The internet exists.



Yes...and that is a major part of the problem.


https://youtu.be/fNS4lecOaAc
Something is wrong here. War, disease, death, destruction, hunger, filth, poverty, torture, crime, corruption, and the Ice Capades. Something is definitely wrong. This is not good work. If this is the best God can do, I am not impressed.

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Re: This is Us

Postby uniface » Mon Mar 28, 2016 4:27 pm

Once again, adopting a tone of mockery suffices in place of evidence and reason.

Hell, even of memory.

Remember "Spain blew up the American battleship Maine in Cuba" ?

Remember the Lusitania (which, when the records were finally de-classified turns out to have been loaded to the gunwales with munitions bound for England, in gross violation of International Law) ?

How about "Pearl Harbor was a complete, treacherous surprise" ?

The "Lone gunman" who assassinated President Kennedy is always good for a laugh . . .

Gulf of Tonkin Incident maybe ?

Wait -- I know ! 9-11 and the miraculous suspension of not only physical possibility but of the laws of physics !

At what point will it ever get through your thickish head that when Roosevelt said that, in politics, whenever something happens you can be sure it was planned to happen, he knew what he was talking about ?

No ?

OK. Go back to celebrating the US having killed the same ISIS second-in-command guy for the third time in the last two years. Not to mention Bin Laden three times.

Or are you saving that for The Two Minute Hate ?
uniface
 

Re: This is Us

Postby uniface » Wed Mar 30, 2016 1:43 pm

The American Council of Trustees and Alumni publishes occasional reports on what college students know. Nearly 10 percent of the college graduates surveyed thought Judith Sheindlin, TV’s “Judge Judy,” is a member of the U.S. Supreme Court. Less than 20 percent of the college graduates knew the effect of the Emancipation Proclamation. More than a quarter of the college graduates did not know Franklin D. Roosevelt was president during World War II; one-third did not know he was the president who spearheaded the New Deal. But it is a little mystery why so many college students are illiterate, innumerate and resistant to understanding. Let’s look at it . . .

http://patriotrising.com/2016/03/30/campus-lunacy/

Consider yourselves "outed," you two. :lol:
uniface
 

Re: This is Us

Postby Minimalist » Wed Mar 30, 2016 6:52 pm

Is there any conspiracy bullshit that you don't fall for? How can one person be so gullible?
Something is wrong here. War, disease, death, destruction, hunger, filth, poverty, torture, crime, corruption, and the Ice Capades. Something is definitely wrong. This is not good work. If this is the best God can do, I am not impressed.

-- George Carlin
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Re: This is Us

Postby uniface » Thu Mar 31, 2016 5:14 am

OK.We can exchange pleasantries first.

Are you a Rent-a-Troll or a volunteer ?

At any rate,

http://professorconfess.blogspot.com/20 ... emale.html
uniface
 

Re: This is Us

Postby Minimalist » Thu Mar 31, 2016 2:24 pm

We're on to you, Uni.

http://www.scientificamerican.com/artic ... theorists/

Research reveals that conspiracy theorists tend to share a core set of traits, regardless of their conspiracy of choice. Low self-esteem, for example, may characterize both those who believe that Paul McCartney died in 1966 and those who think that Britain’s royal family consists of reptilian aliens.
Something is wrong here. War, disease, death, destruction, hunger, filth, poverty, torture, crime, corruption, and the Ice Capades. Something is definitely wrong. This is not good work. If this is the best God can do, I am not impressed.

-- George Carlin
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Re: This is Us

Postby uniface » Fri Apr 01, 2016 8:07 am

OK then.

Here's one more nearly your speed:

http://www.frankiewithlotsoffans.blogspot.ca/
uniface
 

Re: This is Us

Postby uniface » Sat Apr 02, 2016 3:52 pm

Research reveals that conspiracy theorists tend to share a core set of traits, regardless of their conspiracy of choice. Low self-esteem, for example, may characterize both those who believe that Paul McCartney died in 1966 and those who think that Britain’s royal family consists of reptilian aliens.


PS : http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2016/03/ ... tacks.html
uniface
 

Re: This is Us

Postby uniface » Sat Apr 02, 2016 4:04 pm

Back on topic now.

Dr Peter Fletcher, who was Chief Scientific Officer at the Department of Health, said if it is proven that the jab causes autism, "the refusal by governments to evaluate the risks properly will make this one of the greatest scandals in medical history".

He added that after agreeing to be an expert witness on drug-safety trials for parents' lawyers, he had received and studied thousands of documents relating to the case which he believed the public had a right to see.

He said he has seen a "steady accumulation of evidence" from scientists worldwide that the measles, mumps and rubella jab is causing brain damage in certain children.

But he added: "There are very powerful people in positions of great authority in Britain and elsewhere who have staked their reputations and careers on the safety of MMR and they are willing to do almost anything to protect themselves."


http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/artic ... -true.html
uniface
 

Re: This is Us

Postby circumspice » Sun Apr 03, 2016 7:37 am

How is any of this bullshit relevant to an archaeological forum?
LUCEO NON URO
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Re: This is Us

Postby Minimalist » Sun Apr 03, 2016 12:25 pm

Uni is about to claim that aliens did everything.
Something is wrong here. War, disease, death, destruction, hunger, filth, poverty, torture, crime, corruption, and the Ice Capades. Something is definitely wrong. This is not good work. If this is the best God can do, I am not impressed.

-- George Carlin
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Posts: 15420
Joined: Mon Sep 26, 2005 1:09 pm
Location: Arizona

Re: This is Us

Postby uniface » Sun Apr 03, 2016 2:19 pm

How is any of this bullshit relevant to an archaeological forum?


It's posted in The Everything Else Forum.

Now what do you suppose that means ? :oops:
uniface
 

Re: This is Us

Postby MichelleH » Tue Apr 05, 2016 11:03 am

uniface wrote:
How is any of this bullshit relevant to an archaeological forum?


It's posted in The Everything Else Forum.

Now what do you suppose that means ? :oops:


It means it is for general topics that don't fit in other threads, not a promotional board for conspiracy and crackpot crap. Of which I am getting fed up with.
We've Got Fossils - We win ~ Lewis Black

Red meat, cheese, tobacco, and liquor...it works for me ~ Anthony Bourdain

Atheism is a non-prophet organization.
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Re: This is Us

Postby circumspice » Tue Apr 05, 2016 11:15 am

Next up: A misogynistic rant from uni...
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