Ancient Civilization Found - Kyrgyzstan

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Ancient Civilization Found - Kyrgyzstan

Postby Beagle » Sat Dec 29, 2007 4:14 pm

http://en.rian.ru/analysis/20071227/94372640.html

MOSCOW. (Nikolai Lukashov for RIA Novosti) - An international archeological expedition to Lake Issyk Kul, high in the Kyrgyz mountains, proves the existence of an advanced civilization 25 centuries ago, equal in development to the Hellenic civilizations of the northern coast of the Pontus Euxinus (Black Sea) and the Mediterranean coast of Egypt.

The expedition resulted in sensational finds, including the discovery of major settlements, presently buried underwater. The data and artefacts obtained, which are currently under study, apply the finishing touches to the many years of exploration in the lake, made by seven previous expeditions. The addition of a previously unknown culture to the treasury of history extends the idea of the patterns and regularities of human development.

Kyrgyz historians, led by Vladimir Ploskikh, vice president of the Kyrgyz Academy of Sciences, worked side-by-side with Russian colleagues, lead by historian Svetlana Lukashova and myself. All the Russians involved were experienced skin-divers and members of the Russian Confederation of Underwater Sports. We were responsible for the work done under water. Scuba divers ventured into the lake many times to study its bottom.

Last year, we worked near the north coast at depths of 5-10 metres to discover formidable walls, some stretching for 500 meters-traces of a large city with an area of several square kilometers. In other words, it was a metropolis in its time. We also found Scythian burial mounds, eroded by waves over the centuries, and numerous well preserved artifacts-bronze battleaxes, arrowheads, self-sharpening daggers, objects discarded by smiths, casting molds, and a faceted gold bar, which was a monetary unit of the time.

Lake Issyk Kul has played a tremendous role since the inception of human history due to its geographic location at the crossing of Indo-Aryan and other nomadic routes. Archeologists found traces of many religions here-Zoroastrianism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Somewhere in the vicinity was Chihu, the metropolitan city of a mighty state of Wusung nomads, which ancient Chinese chronicles mentioned on many occasions.

The Great Silk Road lay along the lake's coast until the 18th century. Even today, the descendants of caravan drivers recollect their ancestors' stories about travelling from Asia to Europe and back.

Tamerlane built a fortress on one of the lake islets to hold aristocratic captives and keep his treasures. The famous Asian expeditions of Russian explorers Dmitry Przhevalsky and Pyotr Semyonov-Tianshansky started from that spot.

The latter left us an enticing mystery. When he visited Venice in 1850, he looked at the Catalan Atlas of 1375 and came across a picture of a lakeside monastery with the caption: "The spot is named Isikol. Here is a monastery of Armenian brethren, which is rumored to possess the relics of St. Matthew the Apostle and Evangelist."

Semyonov-Tianshansky embarked on a relentless but vain search for the shrine. To all appearances, the monastery was engulfed by water. Hydrologists have not to this day sufficiently studied the unique lake with regular shifts in its water level. Some changes are gradual, others sudden and disastrous since they are caused by earthquakes and torrents of water rush from lakes higher up in the mountains. Floods recede sooner or later, and people come back to the shores-only to become the victims of other floods 500-700 years later.

Throughout the years of their partnership, Russian and Kyrgyz archeologists discovered and examined more than ten major flooded urban and rural settlements of varying ages. Their ample finds generously add to present-day ideas of everyday life in times long ago.

Some artifacts are stunning. A 2,500 year-old ritual bronze cauldron was found on the bottom of the lake. The subtlety of its craftsmanship is amazing. Such excellent quality of joining details together can be presently obtained by metalwork in an inert gas. How did ancient people achieve their high-tech perfection? Also of superb workmanship are bronze mirrors, festive horse harnesses and many other objects. Articles identified as the world's oldest extant coins were also found underwater-gold wire rings used as small change and a large hexahedral goldpiece.

Side by side with the settlements are remnants of ritual complexes of times immemorial, dwellings and household outbuildings. Later expeditions will study them.

The information collected there allows us to conjecture that local people had a socio-economic system hitherto unknown to historians. As a blending of nomadic and settled life, it either gradually evolved into something different or-more likely-was destroyed by one of the many local floods. Legends confirm the latter assumption.



Impressive civilization found in a lake in the Kyrgyz mountains. It was probably destroyed by flood. 8)
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Postby Beagle » Sat Dec 29, 2007 5:58 pm

Image

A map of Kyrgyzstan. Lake Issyk Kul is in the top right of the pic. Although on the border with China, the people of this civilization had European features, such as red hair and blue eyes.
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Postby Minimalist » Sat Dec 29, 2007 6:21 pm

It was probably destroyed by flood.



Who let Arch in?
Something is wrong here. War, disease, death, destruction, hunger, filth, poverty, torture, crime, corruption, and the Ice Capades. Something is definitely wrong. This is not good work. If this is the best God can do, I am not impressed.

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Postby kbs2244 » Sat Dec 29, 2007 7:16 pm

Some things need some explaining here.

The lake surface is at 5150 feet and it is 2140 feet deep.
That is pretty high up to get flooded by lakes above it.
Wikipedia says there are legends saying that four drowned cities lie at the bottom of the lake.

It is a salt water lake. It cannot have a very big watershed feeding it. The satellite photo shows it setting pretty much in a cup like valley. No large flow in or out.

But all the other salt water lakes sit in low spots. Not at the headwaters of all the local rivers, as you can see from the map.

How could a salt water lake support the economy of four cities?
How deep down are they and what would have been the size of the lake at their time period. If the trade routes were meeting there in the time frame of the four cities, we would expect some mention of them somewhere.

To flood four cities would take a lot of water, even in a basin with steep sides. Where did the water come from? And when?
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Postby Beagle » Sat Dec 29, 2007 7:49 pm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Issyk_Kul

Good questions KB. Wiki is a little helpful, but I don't understand why the lake is so warm. No mention is made of geothermal features. :?
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Postby Digit » Sun Dec 30, 2007 3:33 am

Min, you should make a New Years' resolution to leave Arch alone. 8)
First people deny a thing, then they belittle it, then they say it was known all along! Von Humboldt
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Postby Minimalist » Sun Dec 30, 2007 9:55 am

Since he got banned from Koko's (quite a trick...really...but he managed it!) I haven't had anything to do with him.....except to use one poster to send "messages" to him at Koreabridge.

Still.....New Year's is a time for "reminiscing!"
Something is wrong here. War, disease, death, destruction, hunger, filth, poverty, torture, crime, corruption, and the Ice Capades. Something is definitely wrong. This is not good work. If this is the best God can do, I am not impressed.

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Postby Digit » Sun Dec 30, 2007 10:09 am

Tch! Tch! Tch! :cry:
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Postby Ishtar » Sun Dec 30, 2007 10:19 am

I agree with you, Digit.

What was it we used to say about the IRA in this country, about not giving them the oxygen of publicity?

Every time someone replies to him, he gains in stature.

It's like the saying: 'whatever you resist, persists.'

Or the tale of Brer Rabbit and the Tar Baby...

Did you ever read that story?

OK, that's enough metaphors [Ed].
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Postby Minimalist » Sun Dec 30, 2007 2:45 pm

Every time someone replies to him, he gains in stature.



But every time he replies he looks nuttier than before!
Something is wrong here. War, disease, death, destruction, hunger, filth, poverty, torture, crime, corruption, and the Ice Capades. Something is definitely wrong. This is not good work. If this is the best God can do, I am not impressed.

-- George Carlin
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Postby Ishtar » Sun Dec 30, 2007 2:57 pm

Possibly...but then I ask myself, why am I even engaging with this total tosser!

You give him gold, and he tries to eat it. You give him pearls - and he giggles inanely and throws them out the window.

He has no capacity to understand what any reasonably minded person is trying to say to him. He doesn't have the brain cells for it. So it's a complete waste of time and energy.
Last edited by Ishtar on Sun Dec 30, 2007 3:53 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Digit » Sun Dec 30, 2007 3:28 pm

Did you ever read that story?


Yep! It must be advancing years but I think kids today are missing a ell of a lot!
What about 'Wind in the Willows,' 'Peter Pan' 'The Railway Children'.
I reckon they all beat 'Grand Theft Auto'.
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Postby Ishtar » Sun Dec 30, 2007 3:33 pm

Alice in Wonderland
Little Women
What Katy Did

...oh dear, we are getting old, aren't we? :oops:
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Postby Digit » Sun Dec 30, 2007 3:41 pm

But we had a better childhood than seems to be currently the case Ish.
My early years were spent collecting shrapnel and playing on bomb sites, now parents won't let little Tommy graze a knee if they can help it.
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Postby Ishtar » Sun Dec 30, 2007 3:51 pm

Yeah...we used to play on the railway line. We once had a near miss. My two year old sister was crawling across the crossing and she was halfway across when a steam train came round the corner. Of course, trains went a bit slower in those days. But I still broke the record for the mile in getting to her and grabbing her!
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