Honey Bees

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Postby Rokcet Scientist » Sat Jun 02, 2007 3:58 pm

BTW, for my edification: what is the connection between American honey bees, dying or otherwise, and archaeology?
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Postby Minimalist » Sat Jun 02, 2007 6:34 pm

None that I know of.

What do you want to do? Stay on topic or something?
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Postby john » Sat Jun 02, 2007 9:27 pm

Rokcet Scientist wrote:BTW, for my edification: what is the connection between American honey bees, dying or otherwise, and archaeology?


Couple three things.

One. Apparently, the jamestown indians dreaded the appearance of the hnoeybee, as it signified "the end of life as they knew it". Still researching that one.

Two. The European honeybee was introduced to america by, guess what, boy howdy, europeans, as part of the massive conversion of the american continent from

a contiguous set of cultures from maybe 13000 bc = could call these archeological -

to -

the almost complete elimination of these cultures within 200 years, with the poor ol' european honeybee being (unknown to the hoeybee) an agent of said destruction of aboriginal cultures and pre-european ecologic balances.

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Postby Rokcet Scientist » Sat Jun 02, 2007 11:49 pm

john wrote:
Rokcet Scientist wrote:
BTW, for my edification: what is the connection between American honey bees, dying or otherwise, and archaeology?



Couple three things.



6 things?


One. Apparently, the jamestown indians dreaded the appearance of the hnoeybee, as it signified "the end of life as they knew it". Still researching that one.



Shows you how much they "knew".


Two. The European honeybee was introduced to america by, guess what, boy howdy, europeans, as part of the massive conversion of the american continent from

a contiguous set of cultures from maybe 13000 bc = could call these archeological -



"Archaeological"?
Were these 13000 BC indiginous American honey bees "unearthed" then?


to -

the almost complete elimination of these cultures within 200 years, with the poor ol' european honeybee being (unknown to the hoeybee) an agent of said destruction of aboriginal cultures and pre-european ecologic balances.



If not those 15.000 yr old indiginous American honey bees, then were the 200 yr old indiginous American honey bees – the last of the Mohicans . . . – "unearthed" perhaps?
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Postby Forum Monk » Sun Jun 03, 2007 7:47 am

Minimalist wrote:None that I know of.

What do you want to do? Stay on topic or something?


Topic: Honey Bees
Framework: Science of

Close enough for government work IMO
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Postby john » Mon Jun 04, 2007 8:00 pm

Rokcet Scientist wrote:
john wrote:
Rokcet Scientist wrote:
BTW, for my edification: what is the connection between American honey bees, dying or otherwise, and archaeology?



Couple three things.



6 things?


One. Apparently, the jamestown indians dreaded the appearance of the hnoeybee, as it signified "the end of life as they knew it". Still researching that one.



Shows you how much they "knew".


Two. The European honeybee was introduced to america by, guess what, boy howdy, europeans, as part of the massive conversion of the american continent from

a contiguous set of cultures from maybe 13000 bc = could call these archeological -



"Archaeological"?
Were these 13000 BC indiginous American honey bees "unearthed" then?


to -

the almost complete elimination of these cultures within 200 years, with the poor ol' european honeybee being (unknown to the hoeybee) an agent of said destruction of aboriginal cultures and pre-european ecologic balances.



If not those 15.000 yr old indiginous American honey bees, then were the 200 yr old indiginous American honey bees – the last of the Mohicans . . . – "unearthed" perhaps?



Now...........chickens.

But there is a point here.

WASHINGTON - Why did the chicken cross the ocean? To get to America before Columbus — and from the other direction — according to a new report in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Many scholars had thought chickens arrived in the New World with the early Spanish or Portuguese explorers around the year 1500.

When Juan Pizarro arrived at the Inca empire in 1532, however, he found chickens already being used there, raising the possibility they had been around for some time.

Story continues below ?
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And now, researchers led by Alice Storey at the University of Auckland, New Zealand, report finding evidence that may ruffle some scholarly feathers. They found chicken bones of Polynesian origin at a site in what is now Chile.

Radiocarbon dating of chicken bones at the site on the Arauco Peninsula in south central Chile indicated a range of A.D. 1321 to 1407, well before the Spanish arrival in the Americas.

The researchers were able to obtain DNA from some of the bones of these early birds, and found they were identical to ancient chicken bones previously found in Tonga and Samoa.

Chicken had been used in the Pacific for at least 3,000 years, spreading eastward across the region as Polynesians gradually populated the islands.

The DNA from these chickens also shared some unique sequences with modern Araucana chickens from South America and some current chicken types in Hawaii and Southeast Asia, the researchers found.



The European honeybee was just a latter example of this sort of human colonialism.

Chickens and honeybees, innocent enough on the surface, but they changed a continent.

NOT - gasp! - to speak of the idea that America may have been originally populated from the West, and not by the Beringian land bridge either.

But from the sea. Polynesian chickens, anyone?

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Postby Rokcet Scientist » Tue Jun 05, 2007 1:56 am

It's not either/or, John. It's and/and.
Across the sea, across the ice, and across the land (bridge).
And it wasn't just once, but hundreds of times.
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Postby ravenwing5910 » Tue Jun 05, 2007 2:35 pm

Minimalist wrote:Which is why one does not let the common people make important decisions.



Then why do we elect them?

Yeah, I'm back 8)
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Postby ravenwing5910 » Tue Jun 05, 2007 3:01 pm

I have to say that I think that this subject is on topic in that the introduction of ferril animals is a long time habit of the human species, and is in itself evidence of human occupation (that being archaeology/anthropology). The fact that the bees are dying off, is a topic for discussion as it opens the door for investigation to previous mass extinctions with cause and effect, that could possibly help to prevent disaster in our near future, or at least prepare for what is coming.

Now as to causes of the die off> has anyone thought that the genetically altered food products, the chemical pesticides/fertilizers and added steroids and other chemicals to enhance production, might have some little bit to do with it? 8)
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Postby Minimalist » Tue Jun 05, 2007 3:02 pm

To quote Lewis Black:

"The choice in the last election was between two bowls of shit."

That's the choice that the people make. The powers-that-be decide who the candidates will be.
Something is wrong here. War, disease, death, destruction, hunger, filth, poverty, torture, crime, corruption, and the Ice Capades. Something is definitely wrong. This is not good work. If this is the best God can do, I am not impressed.

-- George Carlin
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Postby Minimalist » Tue Jun 05, 2007 3:03 pm

Nice to have you back.
Something is wrong here. War, disease, death, destruction, hunger, filth, poverty, torture, crime, corruption, and the Ice Capades. Something is definitely wrong. This is not good work. If this is the best God can do, I am not impressed.

-- George Carlin
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Postby ravenwing5910 » Tue Jun 05, 2007 3:07 pm

Thanks Min, it's good to be back. One more paper, one more final then I am good till fall term. (whew!)
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Postby john » Tue Jun 05, 2007 9:52 pm

Rokcet Scientist wrote:It's not either/or, John. It's and/and.
Across the sea, across the ice, and across the land (bridge).
And it wasn't just once, but hundreds of times.



Never disagreed with that. Just taking it further. Try THOUSANDS of times.


And just for the hell of it,

think of early man as

a pelagic animal.

That's where it starts to make sense to me.


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Postby Rokcet Scientist » Wed Jun 06, 2007 5:09 am

john wrote:
Rokcet Scientist wrote:It's not either/or, John. It's and/and.
Across the sea, across the ice, and across the land (bridge).
And it wasn't just once, but hundreds of times.


Never disagreed with that. Just taking it further. Try THOUSANDS of times.



Let's agree on "many, many times"?
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Postby Starflower » Thu Jun 21, 2007 12:01 pm

A prize winning essay from a local teen.

http://www.mailtribune.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070619/NEWS/706190314
Kelton Shockey, 13, says the bees are tuckered out and stressed from too much feeding on corn syrup and too much trucking around the country to pollinate orchards.

In his 1,300-word essay, which won him a $250 prize and publication in Beeline, a beekeeper's magazine, Kelton argues that harvesting all the bees' honey and feeding them corn or sugar syrup is weakening their immunity to natural pests and diseases.

"Is feeding the bees sugar the equivalent of feeding them 'junk food?' " Shockey asks in his essay. "... Corn syrup does not have any minerals in it, whereas honey is very high in minerals.
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