Canadian Archaeology

The science or study of primitive societies and the nature of man.

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Canadian Archaeology

Postby Beagle » Sun Sep 17, 2006 10:09 pm

http://www.hamiltonspectator.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=hamilton/Layout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1158270615316&call_pageid=1020420665036&col=1112101662670

Oilsands activity has uncovered vast wealth of a different kind -- a 10,000-year-old quarry rich with tools and weapons from some of the first Albertans, including a pristine spearpoint still smeared with the blood of a woolly mammoth


Canada has a great find - aaye!
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Postby Gene » Mon Sep 18, 2006 6:41 am

That is very interesting. I think the oldest continually used Canadian Paleo site so far is near Debert, Nova Scotia.. (some 10,600 yrs.)

see some artifacts.
http://museum.gov.ns.ca/places/debert/debert.htm
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Postby Sam Salmon » Mon Sep 18, 2006 6:29 pm

Thanks for posting that-saw it earlier but forgot-such is the net :roll:

It's a tough slog to dig in the thin acidic soils of Canada's north and this find no doubt gives impetus/hope to many archaeologists here.
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Postby Minimalist » Mon Sep 18, 2006 7:01 pm

TransCanada PipeLines has rerouted a line to avoid the site. Shell Canada has altered plans in the area.



Now this is impressive. Exxon would have paid Bush and his gang off so they could put a well right in the middle of it!

Good thing it was in Canada.
Something is wrong here. War, disease, death, destruction, hunger, filth, poverty, torture, crime, corruption, and the Ice Capades. Something is definitely wrong. This is not good work. If this is the best God can do, I am not impressed.

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Postby Beagle » Fri Sep 29, 2006 8:53 pm

http://www.firstperspective.ca/fp_template.php?path=20060928plains

For the First Nations plains people who inhabited the reaches of Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta, growing cultural sophistication was not merely the result of European contact, but was rather an indigenous development, suggests a Canadian archaeological review.

A new archaeological study published by the Canadian academic suggests that the ancestors of modern First Nations people living on the Plains were more sophisticated than previously thought


It makes you wonder what they previously thought. :?
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Postby Beagle » Fri Apr 04, 2008 3:42 pm

http://www.newswire.ca/en/releases/archive/April2008/04/c2586.html

For a good part of the 16th century, the Basques engaged in the whaling
industry on Canada's East Coast. Years of archival research by historical
geographer Dr. Selma Barkham helped identify Red Bay, Labrador, as a site of
intense Basque activity. Red Bay was the largest shore whaling station, where
vestiges of the Basque presence tell a compelling story of commerce and
courage.
Artifacts profiled in the report include four galeones or naos
(ocean-going vessels), one of which is believed to be the San Juan that sunk
in 1565. Using pioneering techniques, the San Juan was systemically excavated,
raised and recorded in pieces on the surface, reburied and monitored ever
since in order to ensure its preservation for centuries to come.
"This report describes the most comprehensive underwater archaeological
research project ever undertaken in North America, an invaluable addition to
the subject," continued Mr. Doyle. "Our Government appreciates the support
received from the residents of the Red Bay area, numerous international
experts in the field and the Basque Province of Gipuzkoa."


Some pretty neat marine archaeology going on in Canada. 8)
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Postby kbs2244 » Sat Apr 05, 2008 6:01 pm

Just so we don’t forget, Alberta is a heck of a long way from Red Bay.
I think we can suppose any kind of trade or other kind of linkage as being pretty long range,
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Postby Minimalist » Sat Apr 05, 2008 6:53 pm

Alberta is a heck of a long way from Red Bay



But why does it have to be terminus to terminus? All one needs do is speculate about middlemen along the trading network moving goods from east to west and west to east.

Trade goes both ways, no?
Something is wrong here. War, disease, death, destruction, hunger, filth, poverty, torture, crime, corruption, and the Ice Capades. Something is definitely wrong. This is not good work. If this is the best God can do, I am not impressed.

-- George Carlin
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Postby kbs2244 » Sun Apr 06, 2008 12:25 pm

No argument on the trade possibilty, but we are talking something like the entire Silk Road distance and without the same kind of profit motive.
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Postby rich » Sun Apr 06, 2008 1:28 pm

Must've been really strong family ties! :D
i'm not lookin' for who or what made the earth - just who got me dizzy by makin it spin
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