Arboreal phase near Gobekli Tepe

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Re: Arboreal phase near Gobekli Tepe

Postby circumspice » Sat Oct 21, 2017 5:24 pm

Swanz wrote:Peanuts at Gobekli Tepe? This indicates contact with America -- 1st, 2nd, 3rd hand or greater. This does not surprise me, since a very early variety of peanut was found in a Shang Era Chinese tomb roughly 50 years ago. The reference article about Gobekli Tepe cited in this thread is no longer available, so I can't read it for myself.




I read a couple of articles about that site & they never actually said peanuts, they said wild peanuts. I looked up wild peanuts & found that it is a common name for groundnuts. Groundnuts had been exploited by hunter gatherers, then later domesticated by early farmers in West Africa. So it isn't impossible for groundnuts to have reached Anatolia at an early date.
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Re: Arboreal phase near Gobekli Tepe

Postby Simon21 » Sun Oct 22, 2017 5:06 am

Re: Arboreal phase near Gobekli Tepe
Unread postby E.P. Grondine » Sat Oct 21, 2017 4:38 pm

Those almonds and pistachios were important food sources that helped lead to a sedentary life style.


I don't think a sedentary lifestyle requires you to eat almonds and pistachios. It does require deliberate cultivation.

You know, Colin Renfreww gained a certain amount of recognition for his studies on the development of wine.
If GT shows beer production, then someone is going to acquire some recognition as well.


Good old Colin! The Masai make beer, the Mongolians drank fermented mare's milk. Not exactly sedentary were they.
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Re: Arboreal phase near Gobekli Tepe

Postby E.P. Grondine » Wed Oct 25, 2017 8:25 am

http://rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/ ... 5/20160429

Which in turn leads to the question of the date of the discovery of alcohol in all those regions.
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Re: Arboreal phase near Gobekli Tepe

Postby E.P. Grondine » Wed Oct 25, 2017 8:31 am

circumspice wrote:
Swanz wrote:Peanuts at Gobekli Tepe? This indicates contact with America -- 1st, 2nd, 3rd hand or greater. This does not surprise me, since a very early variety of peanut was found in a Shang Era Chinese tomb roughly 50 years ago. The reference article about Gobekli Tepe cited in this thread is no longer available, so I can't read it for myself.


I read a couple of articles about that site & they never actually said peanuts, they said wild peanuts. I looked up wild peanuts & found that it is a common name for groundnuts. Groundnuts had been exploited by hunter gatherers, then later domesticated by early farmers in West Africa. So it isn't impossible for groundnuts to have reached Anatolia at an early date.


thank you for that clarification, spice.
The question is the food sources that enabled the semi-sedentary lifestyle found at Gobekli Tepe.
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Re: Arboreal phase near Gobekli Tepe

Postby E.P. Grondine » Wed Oct 25, 2017 8:36 am

Simon21 wrote:Good old Colin!


I once heard Renfrew give a talk on diffussion.
About a hour later, an archaeologist was showing a mass grave from a slaughter.
None the less, "The Radiocarbon Revolution" in European archaeology belongs to Renfrew.
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Re: Arboreal phase near Gobekli Tepe

Postby Tiompan » Wed Oct 25, 2017 9:16 am

E.P. Grondine wrote:The question is the food sources that enabled the semi-sedentary lifestyle found at Gobekli Tepe.


The question was in relation to this thread ,that only you can answer was "B why mention an arboreal phase when there was no evidence for one ?"
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Re: Arboreal phase near Gobekli Tepe

Postby E.P. Grondine » Fri Oct 27, 2017 8:05 am

Tiompan wrote:
E.P. Grondine wrote:The question is the food sources that enabled the semi-sedentary lifestyle found at Gobekli Tepe.


The question was in relation to this thread ,that only you can answer was "But why mention an arboreal phase when there was no evidence for one ?"


tiompan, you're lack of experience working with semi-sedentary peoples' sites is showing.
You're focusing on Gobekli Tepe, while ignoring its predecessors.
Once again, in my opinion, the large stones likely had predecessors: large trees.
I am interested in the dating of the use of quarry at Gobekli Tepe,
and preceding dugout canoes in the region.
As excavation proceeds to the lower levels, and to the quarry, we'll see what they find.
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Re: Arboreal phase near Gobekli Tepe

Postby Tiompan » Fri Oct 27, 2017 8:31 am

E.P. Grondine wrote:You're focusing on Gobekli Tepe, while ignoring its predecessors.
Once again, in my opinion, the large stones likely had predecessors: large trees.

E.P.
I am focusing on the title of the thread ."Arboreal phase near Gobekli Tepe "
There is no evidence for an "arboreal phase " near Gobekli Tepe .
Once again, your opinion is fantasy .
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Re: Arboreal phase near Gobekli Tepe

Postby Minimalist » Fri Oct 27, 2017 4:07 pm

Perhaps someone figured out that the peanut was indigenous to South America, realized the story was bullshit, and pulled it?
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Re: Arboreal phase near Gobekli Tepe

Postby E.P. Grondine » Sun Dec 10, 2017 6:58 am

New site summary:

http://popular-archaeology.com/issue/fa ... gious-site

I think that a climate controlled inflatable structure may be what they need.

Once again, nuts seem to have played a major role in their diet.
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Re: Arboreal phase near Gobekli Tepe

Postby Simon21 » Mon Dec 11, 2017 5:07 am

An interesting site, pity about the wild speculation. If no one can be definitive about whether there was a settlement of some kind it indicates an enormous amount of work remains to be done.
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Re: Arboreal phase near Gobekli Tepe

Postby Minimalist » Thu Jan 04, 2018 8:56 pm

This was sent to me by Youtube as a "Recommendation." I really must speak to them about that!

Anyway.

https://youtu.be/dQ8_qHZRu6o


You'll get the gist of this in the first few moments but it will make the subsequent debunking more plain.

https://tepetelegrams.wordpress.com/201 ... nt-page-1/

So, to answer the question posed in this headline: No. No, Göbekli Tepe was not built by Aboriginal Australians. The superficial similarities in iconography and art are exceptional coincidences in the best and misinterpretations in the most unfavourable case. With the same line of argument one could think, the early Neolithic hunter-gatherers of Göbekli Tepe were already inventing the letter “T” due to the characteristic shape of these omnipresent pillars …
Something is wrong here. War, disease, death, destruction, hunger, filth, poverty, torture, crime, corruption, and the Ice Capades. Something is definitely wrong. This is not good work. If this is the best God can do, I am not impressed.

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Re: Arboreal phase near Gobekli Tepe

Postby Tiompan » Fri Jan 05, 2018 3:08 am

Reminiscent of EP's fantasy and the Jerf el Ahmar plaques , even down to the explanation .
See viewtopic.php?f=10&t=3855&p=73945&hilit=munn#p73945
or
Tiompan wrote:
One of the classics of Australian symbolism is Nancy D .Munn’s “Walibiri Iconography: Graphic Representation and cultural symbolism in a cenrtral Australian society “ The arcs ,which are found in nearly all areas where rock art is to be found usually represent actors , often human but they can be animals e.g. oppossums , the dots can represent head as she suggests or increase i.e. plularity . Exactly the same symbol complete with ethnographic explanation and with no possibility of the the interpretation being the Draconids . Arcs and dots are some of the basic forms used world wide in rock art and symbols ,they can represent many things depending on the culture that is doing the representing .
the point is that you can make up any old BS and suggest what you like but some things are going to be much less likely than others. . “
“We have been over the interpretation of these markings before ,as is often the case the “interpretation”, like a rorschach test ,
tells us more about the personal obsessions of the interpreter than the actual markings ."

It is worth noting that Australia is one of few areas where we have any direct link to information regarding mythologies related to engravings /paintings .
It is also the place where rock art researchers are most reluctant to provide “interpretations “ and when they do , they place them in quotes .
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Re: Arboreal phase near Gobekli Tepe

Postby Simon21 » Wed Jan 10, 2018 2:21 am

Attempting to give a certain definition to symbols thousands of years after the culture that produced them is self-obviously a fool's errand.

As is over-jargonising in an attempt to boost one's credibility. "Arboreal phase" what does that mean? A mad desire to grow shrubberies, pace Monty Python and the knights of Ni?
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Re: Arboreal phase near Gobekli Tepe

Postby E.P. Grondine » Wed Jan 10, 2018 7:51 am

Hi simon -

You have to remember that in North America, cultures based on nut use emerged long before those based on domesticated crops.
As a matter of fact, the nut use probably allowed a sedentary lifestyle wherein crops were domesticated.

Attempting to tell you or tiompan that two comet fragments hit at the start of the Holocene is probably a fool's errand.
But those who actually work in the field of impact studies have no problem with it.
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