Some thoughts on new technologies in archaeology

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Re: Some thoughts on new technologies in archaeology

Postby E.P. Grondine » Mon May 29, 2017 9:12 am

Usually people believe what they want to believe until reality intrudes.
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Re: Some thoughts on new technologies in archaeology

Postby kbs2244 » Mon May 29, 2017 11:19 am

This makes you wonder what and if they will ever find what has been lost by the overuse of the "delete" key.
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Re: Some thoughts on new technologies in archaeology

Postby E.P. Grondine » Wed Jun 21, 2017 10:33 am

The fading of Mixtec green to brown is very annoying.

Compare

Image

with

Image

The second can easily be restored by multi-spectral imaging.
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Re: Some thoughts on new technologies in archaeology

Postby Minimalist » Thu Jun 29, 2017 7:24 pm

Another triumph for Israel Finkelstein and his team.

Continuing to combine modern science with archaeology he has utilized multispectral imaging on a 7th century BC ostracon and found additional lines of text on both the front and the back which were not visible to either the human eye or modern digital photography.

The fact that the piece had been in a museum for a half century suggests that it is time to start looking at similar ink-on-ostraca writings to see what else can be won back from the sands of time.

http://journals.plos.org/plosone/articl ... ne.0178400
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Re: Some thoughts on new technologies in archaeology

Postby E.P. Grondine » Thu Jul 06, 2017 12:15 pm

min, I apologize for not noticing your post.

Here's a recovery:
https://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot ... PHqkcAX.97

While developing this technique is going to be mathematically and computationally challenging,
it is a real muscle flexing.

I believe I've already commented here on the use of AI to reconstruct ancient texts.
Every line will eventually feed into those processes.
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Re: Some thoughts on new technologies in archaeology

Postby kbs2244 » Thu Jul 06, 2017 3:06 pm

Continuing on a "how did they do it" theme.
From the current news page.
Roman concrete has been examined a lot, but this is the latest.

http://popular-archaeology.com/issue/su ... romans-did
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Re: Some thoughts on new technologies in archaeology

Postby Minimalist » Fri Jul 07, 2017 10:42 pm

I wonder if any old volcanic ash will work or if there is something special about the Pozzuoli region? I suppose it could be an economic boom for the area near Naples.... until Vesuvius blows again.

And, yeah, E.P. that is an amazing story. Delving into history for a moment I have always found it strange that Philodemus should have been such a favorite of that family. Lucius Calpurnius Piso was Julius Caesar's father-in-law. He was also the owner of the Villa in question and although he died in 43 BC ( and Philodemus himself died between 35 and 40 BC in Herculaneum) it seems a tad odd that there should be such a single-minded fixation on the works of one Epicurean philosopher. Perhaps Piso was his patron? But even then we should expect the works of other Epicureans to be represented.

Now it is true that the family of the Calpurnii remained very important throughout the first centuries BC and AD. Piso's son, also named Lucius, was consul in 15 BC and the Roman consular list as it has come down to us shows any number of Calpurnian males attaining the the office. What does seem odd is that the family would have maintained their interest in Philodemus for essentially a century after his death. I suppose we will never find out an answer to that one?
Something is wrong here. War, disease, death, destruction, hunger, filth, poverty, torture, crime, corruption, and the Ice Capades. Something is definitely wrong. This is not good work. If this is the best God can do, I am not impressed.

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Re: Some thoughts on new technologies in archaeology

Postby E.P. Grondine » Tue Jul 11, 2017 10:47 am

Portable X-ray Florescence:

https://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot ... 8u3MEMU.97

Now if this were applied to the Mixtec hieroglyphic manuscript shown above!
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Re: Some thoughts on new technologies in archaeology

Postby E.P. Grondine » Tue Jul 11, 2017 11:02 am

https://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot ... 0CU77ku.97

While this is not as interesting as a ceramic shard to reconstruction program, it is interesting.
Personally, I'd be more interested in a catalogue of religious and oral cycle themes in Etruscan pottery.
Last edited by E.P. Grondine on Mon Jul 31, 2017 10:19 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Some thoughts on new technologies in archaeology

Postby E.P. Grondine » Mon Jul 31, 2017 10:16 am

http://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot. ... gueHddG.97

No one thinks about applying this to the palimpsest Mixtec hieroglyphic manuscript.
IN terms of recovering the history of the Valley of Mexico,
this would be of the greatest importance.
It would revolutionize the entire field,
and further aid the decipherment of the existing Mixtec hieroglyphic texts.
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Re: Some thoughts on new technologies in archaeology

Postby E.P. Grondine » Sat Aug 05, 2017 3:20 pm

Image

Image

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/ ... paign=1490

The more powerful tools need to be applied to this.

Image

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/ ... nding.html

http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-25106956

"The Italian authorities are reluctant to permit further excavation, arguing that this would be disruptive for residents of the modern town of Ercolano, built literally on top of Herculaneum.
They also point out that 300-400 of the original rolls remain unread."

Second objection disappearing rapidly, leaving only the first.

Image

http://www.esrf.eu/home/UsersAndScience ... XNP04.html

https://www.nature.com/articles/srep27227/

https://www.researchgate.net/publicatio ... st_imaging
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Re: Some thoughts on new technologies in archaeology

Postby E.P. Grondine » Mon Aug 14, 2017 8:28 am

http://www.tornosnews.gr/en/greek-news/ ... video.html

Personally, I never thought that the X-ray images would get sufficient resolution.

I had thought that the only way possible would be to use a polymer solution to attach the papyri to thin metal strips,
and then unroll them.

It now appears that the teams are using complex mathematics to describe the surfaces, and then virtually unroll them,
bu I wonder if AI algorithms to find the letters by adjacent data points might not be more efficient.

But the fundamental problem remains:
"The Italian authorities are reluctant to permit further excavation, arguing that this would be disruptive for residents of the modern town of Ercolano, built literally on top of Herculaneum."
The only way progress might be made is if "someone" buys them out.
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Re: Some thoughts on new technologies in archaeology

Postby E.P. Grondine » Mon Aug 14, 2017 8:32 am

The Germans have developed an EMR sledge with multiple sensors which can survey acres in a few days.
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